Are you STILL trading your time for money?

By Les Popham

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November 12, 2020

Hello again, everybody!

For those of you wondering where last week’s blog post went, I have a confession to make.

I didn’t write one. Sorry – I simply forgot to do it.

I’ll try and make up for my omission by giving you a double dip this week.

 

Are you STILL trading your time (and skills) for money?

Okay, this is a reprise (how do you pronounce that word? Does it rhyme with ‘fleas’ or ‘flies’? Doesn’t matter – we all know what it means) of a piece I posted several weeks ago, but I make no apologies for coming back to it, because it’s an important question.

A VERY important question.

The majority of us do it, most probably on our parents’ advice.

“Finish your education, (possibly including getting a degree), find a job, get married, have kids.”

And then you continue trading your time for money. After all, you have a family to feed, and bills to pay. Don’t you?

I know, I’ve been there.

But there are alternatives.

REAL, serious alternatives.

Close your eyes for a moment, and imagine a future where you make money without having to work for it.

To have people buying from you while you’re out for a walk in the country, when you’re on holiday, or even while you’re asleep.

Fantasy?

No.

It’s perfectly possible. I know, because it’s what I do.

It requires a fundamental switch of mindset, from ‘How can I get more work?’ to ‘How can I make money without working?’

If you choose the latter, I’d suggest it’s the best choice.

Now, you have a problem. You want to make money without working, but how do you actually do that?

It’s actually easier than you think, but you do need to put in some work to make it happen.

 

You need three things:

1)        Firstly, you need an audience with a shared interest in something. The ‘something’ could be home baking, it could be golf, it could be fishing, it could be classic cars. Doesn’t matter, provided your people share a common interest.

It could be something you already have expertise in. That would be good, because you will be able to speak with some authority on the subject.

2)        Then you need one or more suppliers of things your audience would be interested in. There are thousands upon thousands of companies out there, all looking for more customers.

3)        Finally, you need a website where you can display pictures and details of your products. A shop window, if you like.

A couple of points to note:

You’ll need to strike a deal with your supplier(s) to split the profits on the sales you facilitate. You should be able to get better than 50% (I get 80%, by the way).

And the bigger your audience, the more leverage you have.

Finally, you need to find a supplier who is willing and able to actually send the products to the customers. It’s called fulfillment.

 

In my case, my supplier (the UK’s leading internet marketing training company) takes all their orders online, and delivers them digitally, so that no physical contact is required. This is particularly important at the moment, of course.

Of the three things listed above, the bit you have to put the most effort into is building your audience.

Don’t waste your time gathering random contacts on social media – there’s no focus on shared interests in that approach. Quality trumps quantity every time.

And don’t expect immediate results – be consistent, give value, and be patient.

It will come in time.
I’ve been using LinkedIn for some two years now, and my network is close to 9,000 professionals scattered across the globe, selected on the basis of how likely they are to benefit from doing business through me.

The fact is, it works!

And if I can do it, so can you!

 

Message me if you’d like to know more.

See you all again next week!

Leslie

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